Sunday, March 9, 2014

A Call for Neutrality on Ukraine

Here's an opinion from Harleigh Kyson that I thought deserved a post of its own.  I'm basically in agreement with all his points. Neutrality is an old American tradition, and I think it's about time we revived it:

I believe that the US should maintain a position of strict neutrality on the Ukranian question. What happens there is none of our business. It should remain a problem for the Russians, the Ukranians, and the European Union to deal with.

If we should go to war with Russia over this issue--or any other issue--the war would probably escalate into an exchange of missiles with hydrogen-bomb warheads. If this should happen, we would launch a nuclear winter, and the ecology of our planet would radically change, possibly---perhaps probably--causing our extinction as a species.

If you are interested in historical analogies, I would offer the following: During the Civil War, the English sided with the Confederacy because they needed their cotton to weave into textiles. Through skilled diplomacy, Lincoln's ambassador to England, Charles Francis Adams, succeeded in keeping England largely neutral, though they did manufacture some war materiel for the Confederacy.

In the case of the crisis in the Ukraine, We are in the same position that England was during our Civil War. If the English had supported the South, the Washington government would have been very angry with them. If we interfere in the Ukraine, Putin would be quite justified in being angry with us.

It should be noted that during the Soviet era, the Ukraine was part of the Soviet Union, and many Russians settled there. In the Eastern Ukraine, there are many Russians who want to affiliate themselves with the Russian government and not Western Europe. It is reasonable for them to want to do this, and we should not help either them or the new Kiev government.

2 comments:

  1. And that goes doubly so until there actually is an elected government. The current one was installed by the US State Department, as heard in the famous wiretapped phone call they had with the US ambassador in Kiev (who was openly trying to overthrow the naive government hosting him. Janokovich never sent him home for that).

    The Rada (parliament) was agreeing with Janokovich one day and against him the next only because half the deputies were chased away with death threats from the far right groups that were marauding after being bussed in from Lviv.

    Yes, this was one of the few times in history that a government was overthrown by bussing in people from a far off city. It was a flash mob.

    That would be equivalent to a whole bunch of people from Houston, Texas making a road trip and marauding in Washington DC.and telling all the Democrats that they will be killed if they show up in the Capitol the next day. Then, the next day the Senate would be half full and passing all sorts of anti-Democrat laws.

    And then every country on Earth recognizes the new government formed with nary a word about how it really happened. All the world's journalists would then say that the American people rose up and ousted an unpopular President. Not. .

    ReplyDelete
  2. I quite agree. However, they've been busy subverting the Ukraine for the past twenty or so years. Five billion spent doing this according to Nuland. I don't think there's any American that wouldn't be outraged if they found out foreign countries were busy recruiting and paying people here in order to influence our politics, let alone orchestrating a coup. That's what they have there now, an unrepresentative government put in by a coup. It's illegitimate. The US is deliberately pushing and ratcheting up tension. We didn't like nukes in Cuba very much. I can't see anything positive coming out of all this.

    ReplyDelete