Monday, March 18, 2013

The Right Wing of the Right Wing


That's what I heard some chuckle-head refer to the CPAC conference as.  Actually, of course, CPAC averages well to the left of the first Bush administration, never mind Reagan.  The thing is, the most radical guy there was Rand Paul, who won the popularity contest, and despite the fact that he's right on a number of issues, he still falls all over himself to be politically correct, dashing off to worship at the Wailing Wall, and assuring us that he'll happily welcome Third-world peasants to come in and sign up for welfare and vote Democratic.  And the number two guy, Marco Rubio,

is, laughably, a couple light years to the left of Rand.

But that's not to say nothing good happened at CPAC.  Matt Parrott tells us about some incidents, one of which illustrates an apparent paradox:  racial minorities are so sick of being patronized by idiot White liberal, they prefer the company of White nationalists.


Oratorical Terrorism:
How Scott Terry Ruined CPAC
Matt Parrott


1,049 words

The Republican Party faithful are in a blind panic, desperate for answers and clarity in the wake of a devastating defeat. This year’s CPAC was an opportunity for them to gather under one roof and chart a path forward.

The usual suspects made the usual arguments.

Ron Paul’s housebroken vanguard insisted that obsessively blathering about the Constitution and “liberty” would guarantee victory.

The wonks lamented their inferior logistical framework, promising to catch up with the DNC’s 2012 ground game by 2016.

The mouthpieces of the technicolor technocrats who actually control the RNC promised more minority outreach, hipness, and amnesty.

Ann Coulter delivered on her shtick, staking out the most politically incorrect position allowed inside the tent. This year, to her credit, she’s declared herself a single-issue voter against the amnesty being crammed down our throats by the Beltway insiders.

But Ann Coulter was upstaged this year by the debut of a new bomb-thrower at CPAC: White Nationalism’s very own Scott Terry. Scott asked a question during the Q&A phase of a workshop entitled “Trump The Race Card: Are You Sick And Tired Of Being Called A Racist When You Know You’re Not One?”

“It seems to be that you’re reaching out to voters at the expense of young white Southern males,” Terry said, adding he “came to love my people and culture” who were “being systematically disenfranchised.”

The Black man leading the presentation, K. Carl Smith, calmly and directly fielded the question.

In a counter-intuitive turn of events, even the Black attendees were sympathetic to Terry . . .

Chad Chapman, 21, one of the few black attendees, said overall he enjoyed the event — except “there were lots of interruptions, mainly because of the woman.”

I asked whether he was concerned about the question from Terry and Heimbach.

“No they were just telling the truth,” he said.

The presenter even released a statement in the aftermath declaring that he had befriended Terry.
(It keeps getting better.  Read the rest HERE.)

2 comments:

  1. The idea that it is necessary to betray White America to gain the support of the decent people (the vast majority, I might add) is a delusion of White Liberals, If alleged white conservatives have bought into this lie then they are doomed. Only people honestly proud of their white blood can respect the pride of Brown and black America enough so that we become just America. Destroyng the rights of White Americans makes the rights of Americans of Colour pathetic jokes. It is time for someone to proclaim and practice this, not just turn this thought into meaningless rhetoric.

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    Replies
    1. Your sentiment is noted and appreciated, Mr. Perez.

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